Bone morphogenetic protein use in anterior cervical spine surgery: A review of current Literature concerning indications, safety, and efficacy

Charles H. Crawford, Jacob M. Buchowski

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein in the anterior cervical spine is controversial. Although recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein has been shown to produce fusion rates as high and likely higher than the "gold standard" autogenous iliac crest and fibula grafts (especially for multilevel fusions), complications associated with its use have been reported. These have included hematoma or seroma formation requiring repeat surgery, severe dysphagia, and anterior neck swelling requiring prolonged hospitalization and treatment. Although it is likely that with appropriate dosage, carrier, placement, and containment, the risk of these complications is not high, surgeons should be aware of the issues surrounding bone morphogenetic protein use in the cervical spine and must be prepared to prevent and/or manage the potentially life-threatening complications associated with its use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-287
Number of pages5
JournalNeurosurgery Quarterly
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Keywords

  • BMP
  • Bone morphogenetic protein
  • Cervical spine
  • OP-1
  • RhBMP-2
  • RhBMP-7

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