Bone metabolism and incretin hormones following glucose ingestion in young adults with pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis

Wang Shin Lei, Marissa J. Kilberg, Babette S. Zemel, Ronald C. Rubenstein, Clea Harris, Saba Sheikh, Andrea Kelly, Joseph M. Kindler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Gut-derived incretin hormones, including glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), regulate post-prandial glucose metabolism by promoting insulin production. GIP, GLP-1, and insulin contribute to the acute bone anti-resorptive effect of macronutrient ingestion by modifying bone turnover. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (PI), which perturbs the incretin response. Cross-talk between the gut and bone (“gut-bone axis”) has not yet been studied in PI-CF. The objectives of this study were to assess changes in biomarkers of bone metabolism during oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) and to test associations between incretins and biomarkers of bone metabolism in individuals with PI-CF. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of previously acquired blood specimens from multi-sample OGTT from individuals with PI-CF ages 14–30 years (n = 23). Changes in insulin, incretins, and biomarkers of bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen [CTX]) and formation (procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide [P1NP]) during OGTT were computed. Results: CTX decreased by 32% by min 120 of OGTT (P < 0.001), but P1NP was unchanged. Increases in GIP from 0 to 30 mins (rho = -0.48, P = 0.03) and decreases in GIP from 30 to 120 mins (rho = 0.62, P = 0.002) correlated with decreases in CTX from mins 0–120. Changes in GLP-1 and insulin were not correlated with changes in CTX, and changes in incretins and insulin were not correlated with changes in P1NP. Conclusions: Intact GIP response was correlated with the bone anti-resorptive effect of glucose ingestion, represented by a decrease in CTX. Since incretin hormones might contribute to development of diabetes and bone disease in CF, the “gut-bone axis” warrants further attention in CF during the years surrounding peak bone mass attainment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100304
JournalJournal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology
Volume30
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Incretins
  • Nutrition
  • OGTT

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Bone metabolism and incretin hormones following glucose ingestion in young adults with pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this