Body mass index and regular smoking in young adult women

Alexis E. Duncan, Christina N. Lessov-Schlaggar, Elliot C. Nelson, Michele L. Pergadia, Pamela A.F. Madden, Andrew C. Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the relationship between relative body weight and transition from experimentation to regular smoking in young adult women. In the current study, data from 2494 participants in wave 4 of the Missouri Adolescent Female Twin Study (aged 18-29. years) who reported ever smoking a cigarette were analyzed using logistic regression. Body mass index (BMI) at time of interview was categorized according to CDC adult guidelines, and regular smoking was defined as having ever smoked 100 or more cigarettes and having smoked at least once a week for two months in a row. Since the OR's for the overweight and obese groups did not differ significantly from one another in any model tested, these groups were combined. Forty-five percent of women who had ever smoked had become regular smokers. Testing of interactions between potential covariates and levels of the categorical BMI variable revealed a significant interaction between overweight/obesity and childhood sexual abuse (CSA; p < 0.001) associated with regular smoking. Among women reporting CSA, the association between overweight/obesity and having become a regular smoker was negative (n. =374; OR. =0.48, 95% CI: 0.28-0.81). Both underweight and overweight/obesity were positively associated with transition to regular smoking among women who did not report CSA (n. =2076; OR. =1.57, 95% CI: 1.05-2.35 and OR. =1.73, 95% CI: 1.35-2.20, respectively). These results suggest that experiencing CSA alters the association between BMI and regular smoking in women who have experimented with cigarettes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-988
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Childhood sexual abuse
  • MOAFTS
  • Smoking
  • Twins

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