Blood pressure genetic risk score predicts blood pressure responses to dietary sodium and potassium the GenSalt Study (Genetic epidemiology network of salt sensitivity)

Jovia L. Nierenberg, Changwei Li, Jiang He, Dongfeng Gu, Jichun Chen, Xiangfeng Lu, Jianxin Li, Xigui Wu, C. Charles Gu, James E. Hixson, Dabeeru C. Rao, Tanika N. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the association between genetic risk score (GRS) for blood pressure (BP), based on single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in previous BP genome-wide association study meta-analyses, and salt and potassium sensitivity of BP among participants of the GenSalt study (Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt Sensitivity). The GenSalt study was conducted among 1906 participants who underwent a 7-day low-sodium (51.3 mmol sodium/d), 7-day high-sodium (307.8 mmol sodium/d), and 7-day high-sodium plus potassium (60 mmol potassium/d) intervention. BP was measured 9× at baseline and at the end of each intervention period using a random zero sphygmomanometer. Associations between systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure GRS and respective SBP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure responses to the dietary interventions were assessed using mixed linear regression models that accounted for familial dependencies and adjusted for age, sex, field center, body mass index, and baseline BP. As expected, baseline SBP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure significantly increased per quartile increase in GRS (P=2.7×10-8, 9.8×10-8, and 6.4×10-6, respectively). In contrast, increasing GRS quartile conferred smaller SBP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure responses to the low-sodium intervention (P=1.4×10-3, 0.02, and 0.06, respectively) and smaller SBP responses to the high-sodium and potassium interventions (P=0.10 and 0.05). In addition, overall findings were similar when examining GRS as a continuous measure. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, we identified an inverse relationship between BP GRS and salt and potassium sensitivity of BP. These data may provide novel implications on the relationship between BP responses to dietary sodium and potassium and hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1106-1112
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Diet
  • Genetics
  • Hypertension
  • Sodium

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