Bivariate Latent-Change-Score Analysis of Peer Relations From Early Childhood to Adolescence: Leading or Lagging Indicators of Psychopathology

Brent I. Rappaport, Joshua J. Jackson, Diana J. Whalen, David Pagliaccio, Joan L. Luby, Deanna M. Barch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Understanding longitudinal associations between problematic peer relations and psychopathology is needed to inform public health. Three models have been proposed: Poor peer relations (a) lead or are a risk factor for psychopathology, (b) lag or are a consequence of psychopathology, or (c) both lead and lag psychopathology. Another model is that poor peer relations lead or lag psychopathology depending on the developmental period. To test these models, youths’ peer relations and clinical symptoms were assessed up to six times between ages 3 and 11 in 306 children. Bivariate latent-change-score models tested leading and lagging longitudinal relationships between children’s peer relations (peer victimization/rejection, peer-directed aggression, social withdrawal, prosocial behavior) and psychopathology (depression, anxiety, and externalizing symptoms). Peer victimization/rejection was a leading indicator of depression from early childhood into preadolescence. Peer-directed aggression was a leading indicator of externalizing symptoms (in late childhood).

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Psychological Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • aggressive behaviors
  • depression
  • latent change score
  • peer relations
  • peer victimization

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