Bidirectional temporal associations between sleep and affect and cognitive symptoms among community-dwelling stroke survivors: An ecological momentary assessment study

Stephen C.L. Lau, Martica L. Hall, Lauren Terhorst, Elizabeth R. Skidmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Sleep plays a critical role in daily functioning and stroke recovery but receives little attention in stroke rehabilitation. Sleep disturbances are linked to affective and cognitive impairments, but temporal associations between sleep and affect and cognitive symptoms are less clear. Understanding these temporal associations may inform new directions in intervention and prevention to support continued stroke recovery. Objective: To examine the bidirectional temporal associations between sleep and affect and cognitive symptoms among community-dwelling stroke survivors. Design: A secondary analysis of a longitudinal observational study involving 7 days of ecological momentary assessment (EMA), during which participants completed eight EMA surveys and a sleep diary per day. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze data. Setting: Community. Participants: Community-dwelling stroke survivors (N = 40). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: EMA measures of depressed affect, cheerful affect, and cognitive symptoms. Sleep quality and duration as measured using a sleep diary. Results: Between-person sleep quality was negatively associated with next-day depressed affect (B = −.16; p =.028) and positively associated with next-day cheerful affect (B =.63; p <.001). Inversely, between-person depressed affect was negatively associated with next night sleep quality (B = −.77; p =.015), and vice versa for cheerful affect (between-person: B =.45; p <.001; within-person: B =.09; p =.008). Long sleep (>9 hours) was positively associated with next-day cognitive symptoms (B =.13; p =.002), whereas cognitive symptoms were associated with a higher odds of long sleep the following night (odds ratio [OR] = 0.25; p =.047). Conclusions: This study identified the bidirectional associations of sleep with affect and cognitive symptoms in the context of the everyday life of stroke survivors. The findings suggest that interventions addressing sleep quality and duration may impact affect and cognitive symptoms, and vice versa.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPM and R
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

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