Beach Chair Versus Lateral Decubitus Position: Differences in Suture Anchor Position and Number During Arthroscopic Anterior Shoulder Stabilization

MOON Shoulder Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Arthroscopic shoulder capsulolabral repair using glenoid-based suture anchor fixation provides consistently favorable outcomes for patients with anterior glenohumeral instability. To optimize outcomes, inferior anchor position, especially at the 6-o’clock position, has been emphasized. Proponents of both the beach-chair (BC) and lateral decubitus (LD) positions advocate that this anchor location can be consistently achieved in both positions. Hypothesis: Patient positioning would be associated with the surgeon-reported labral tear length, total number of anchors used, number of anchors in the inferior glenoid, and placement of an anchor at the 6-o’clock position. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional analysis of a prospective multicenter cohort of patients undergoing primary arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair. Patient positioning in the BC versus LD position was determined by the operating surgeon and was not randomized. At the time of operative intervention, surgeon-reported labral tear length, total anchor number, anchor number in the inferior glenoid, and anchor placement at the 6-o’clock position were evaluated between BC and LD cohorts. Descriptive statistics and between-group differences (continuous: t test [normal distributions], Wilcoxon rank sum test [nonnormal distributions], and chi-square test [categorical]) were assessed. Results: In total, 714 patients underwent arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair (BC vs LD, 406 [56.9%] vs 308 [43.1%]). The surgeon-reported labral tear length was greater for patients having surgery in the LD position (BC vs LD [mean ± SD], 123.5°± 49° vs 132.3°± 44°; P =.012). The LD position was associated with more anchors placed in the inferior glenoid and more frequent placement of anchors at the 6-o’clock (BC vs LD, 22.4% vs 51.6%; P <.001). The LD position was more frequently associated with utilization of ≥4 total anchors (BC vs LD, 33.5% vs 46.1%; P <.001). Conclusion: Surgeons utilizing the LD position for arthroscopic capsulolabral repair in patients with anterior shoulder instability more frequently placed anchors in the inferior glenoid and at the 6-o’clock position. Additionally, surgeon-reported labral tear length was longer when utilizing the LD position. These results suggest that patient positioning may influence the total number of anchors used, the number of anchors used in the inferior glenoid, and the frequency of anchor placement at the 6 o’clock position during arthroscopic capsulolabral repair for anterior shoulder instability. How these findings affect clinical outcomes warrants further study. Registration: NCT02075775 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2020-2026
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume49
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • anterior
  • arthroscopy
  • beach-chair
  • lateral decubitus
  • shoulder instability

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