B7.1 costimulation increases T-cell proliferation and cytotoxicity via selective expansion of specific variable alpha and beta genes of the T-cell receptor

Allen K. Chan, Simon Goedegebuure, Wolfram Von Bernstorff, Amanda L. Carritte, Min Chung, Robyn A. Stewart, Leslie Montgomery, Remco A. Spanjaard, Allison B. McKenzie, Timothy Eberlein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Optimal T-cell activation requires not only ligation of the T-cell receptor (TcR) but also delivery of costimulatory signals by various accessory molecules. The interaction of the costimulatory molecule B7.1 (CD80) with its receptor CD28 provides a strong positive signal to T cells. Methods. The B7.1 gene was transduced into cultured human ovarian, breast, and pancreatic tumor cells by using a retrovital vector. Autologous as well as allogeneic naive T-cells were stimulated with either wild-type or B7.1- transduced tumor cells in a mixed lymphocyte tumor cell culture (MLTC). In addition to cytolytic activity, T-cell proliferation, T-cell subset composition, and the frequencies of TcR variable (V) alpha and beta genes were compared in T cells from both types of MLTC. Results. Introduction of the B7.1 gene into tumor cells was successful in all tumors to a varying degree. Those tumors expressing high levels of B7.1 induced significantly higher levels of T-cell proliferation than wild-type tumor cells. T-cell subset composition did not markedly differ between T cells stimulated with wild-type tumor cells or B7.1-expressing tumor cells. However, T cells stimulated with B7.1-expressing tumor cells showed a significantly increased cytolytic potential. The increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity was associated with a higher frequency of specific TcR Vα and Vβ genes. In addition, B7.1 costimulation promoted oligoclonality among the responding T cells. Conclusions. These data suggest that costimulation through B7.1 promotes T-cell proliferation and cytotoxic activity through clonal expansions of T cells bearing antigen-specific TcR Vα and Vβ genes and through promotion of oligoclonality. The data also suggest that promoting B7.1-mediated costimulation is an important aspect of immune therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)342-350
Number of pages9
JournalSurgery
Volume127
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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