Autonomic dysfunction in early breast cancer: Incidence, clinical importance, and underlying mechanisms

Susan G. Lakoski, Lee W. Jones, Ronald J. Krone, Phyllis K. Stein, Jessica M. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autonomic dysfunction represents a loss of normal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system associated with both sympathetic nervous system overdrive and reduced efficacy of the parasympathetic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction is a strong predictor of future coronary heart disease, vascular disease, and sudden cardiac death. In the current review, we will discuss the clinical importance of autonomic dysfunction as a cardiovascular risk marker among breast cancer patients. We will review the effects of antineoplastic therapy on autonomic function, as well as discuss secondary exposures, such as psychological stress, sleep disturbances, weight gain/metabolic derangements, and loss of cardiorespiratory fitness, which may negatively impact autonomic function in breast cancer patients. Lastly, we review potential strategies to improve autonomic function in this population. The perspective can help guide new therapeutic interventions to promote longevity and cardiovascular health among breast cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-241
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume170
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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