Asymmetry of lumbopelvic movement patterns during active hip abduction is a risk factor for low back pain development during standing

Christopher J. Sorensen, Molly B. Johnson, Barbara J. Norton, Jack P. Callaghan, Linda R. Van Dillen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

An induced-pain paradigm has been used in back-healthy people to understand risk factors for developing low back pain (LBP) during prolonged standing. We examined asymmetry of lumbopelvic movement timing during a clinical test of active hip abduction in back-healthy people who developed LBP symptoms during standing (Pain Developers; PDs) compared to back-healthy people who did not develop LBP symptoms during standing (Non Pain Developers, NPDs). Participants completed the hip abduction test while movement was recorded with a motion capture system. Difference in time between start of hip and lumbopelvic movement was calculated (startdiff). PDs moved the lumbopelvic region earlier during left hip abduction than right hip abduction. There was no difference between sides in NPDs. In PDs, the amount of asymmetry was related to average symptom intensity during standing. Asymmetric lumbopelvic movement patterns may be a risk factor for LBP development during prolonged standing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-46
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume50
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Low back pain
  • Lumbopelvic movement
  • Prolonged standing

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