Associations of Circadian Rest-Activity Rhythms With Affect and Cognition in Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors: An Ambulatory Assessment Study

Stephen C.L. Lau, Lisa Tabor Connor, Elizabeth R. Skidmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Rest-activity rhythm (RAR) is a modifiable behavioral factor associated with affect and cognition. Identifying RAR characteristics associated with affect and cognition among stroke survivors provides insight into preventing poststroke affective and cognitive impairment. Objective: To examine the associations of RAR characteristics with affect and cognition among community-dwelling stroke survivors. Methods: Forty participants with mild stroke (mean age = 52.8; 42.5% female; 55% White) reported their affect and cognitive complaints using ecological momentary assessment and wore an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days and completed the National Institutes of Health Toolbox Cognition Battery. RAR characteristics were extracted using parametric and non-parametric approaches. Multivariable linear regressions were used to identify RAR characteristics associated with affect and cognition. Results: Later onset of rest (B = 0.45; P =.008) and activity (B = 0.36; P =.041) were positively associated with depressed affect. These associations were reversed for cheerful effect (rest onset: B = −0.42; P =.017; activity onset: B = −0.39; P =.033). Cheerful affect was also positively associated with relative amplitude (ie, distinctions in activity levels between rest and activity; B =.39; P =.030). Intra-daily variability (ie, RAR fragmentation; B = 0.35; P =.042) and later onset of activity (B =.36; P =.048) were positively associated with cognitive complaints. Less erratic RAR was positively associated with fluid cognition (B = 0.29; P =.036); RAR fragmentation was positively associated with crystallized cognition (B = 0.39; P =.015). Conclusions: We identified RAR correlates of affect and cognition among stroke survivors, highlighting the value of managing RAR and sleep in stroke rehabilitation. Future studies should test whether advancing the onset of rest and activity, promoting a regular active lifestyle, and improving rest and sleep in the nighttime protect stroke survivors from affective and cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-206
Number of pages10
JournalNeurorehabilitation and neural repair
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • accelerometry
  • affect
  • circadian rhythm
  • cognition
  • ecological momentary assessment
  • stroke

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