Assessment of myocardial oxygen extraction fraction and perfusion reserve with BOLD imaging in a canine model with coronary artery stenosis

Haosen Zhang, Robert J. Gropler, Debiao Li, Jie Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of T2-weighted BOLD imaging for estimating regional myocardial oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and approximating perfusion reserve (MPR) simultaneously in a canine model with moderate coronary artery stenosis. Materials and Methods: Eight mongrel dogs with moderate coronary artery stenosis underwent BOLD imaging at rest and during dipyridamole-induced hyperemia, using a turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence. Based on a two-compartment model, myocardial OEFhyperemia was calculated with the corresponding T2. MPR could be approximated based on Fick's law. Results: During responsive hyperemia, a regional hypointensity was observed in the abnormally perfused myocardium, reflecting a relatively smaller myocardial T2 increase (3.06% ± 2.74%, in contrast to 10.19% ± .12% in the normal region). The average OEFs in the normally and abnormally perfused myocardial territories were 0.21 ± .11 and 0.43 ± 0.12, respectively. For the MPR approximated from the BOLD imaging, a strong correlation (R = 0.9) in the normal myocardium and a good correlation (R = 0.6) distal to the stenosis were obtained compared to microsphere results. Conclusion: In a canine model with moderate coronary artery stenosis, TSE-based BOLD imaging can quantitatively estimate the regional OEFhyperemia and approximate the MPR, and can distinguish segments perfused by defected coronary artery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-79
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Keywords

  • BOLD imaging
  • Hyperemia
  • Myocardial oxygen extraction fraction
  • Myocardial perfusion reserve
  • T

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