Are entering obstetrics/gynecology residents more similar to the entering primary care or surgery resident workforce?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We compared demographic characteristics of first-year residents entering obstetrics/gynecology with those entering primary care and surgery. Study Design: We analyzed first-year residents from the 1997-2004 National Graduate Medical Education Census. Multivariable logistic regression models identified independent associations between obstetrics/gynecology residency (compared with primary care and surgery) and demographic predictor variables. Results: More than 90% of studied programs completed the National Graduate Medical Education Census for 146,174 first-year residents. Graduates of US allopathic medical schools, women, African Americans, and entering residents in 2003 and 2004 were more likely to enter obstetrics/gynecology than primary care; Asians were less likely to enter obstetrics/gynecology than primary care. Women, African Americans, and Hispanics were more likely to enter obstetrics/gynecology than surgery; trainees who were Asian, "other" race/ethnicity, and entered residency from 1999-2004 were less likely to enter obstetrics/gynecology than surgery. Conclusion: Demographic characteristics of incoming obstetrics/gynecology-residents differed significantly from both primary care and surgery residents. Obstetrics/gynecology should be a unique category in physician workforce studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)536.e1-536.e6
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume197
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • diversity
  • physician workforce
  • primary care
  • surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Are entering obstetrics/gynecology residents more similar to the entering primary care or surgery resident workforce?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this