Application of a recursive partitioning decision tree algorithm for the prediction of massive transfusion in civilian trauma: the MTPitt prediction tool

Jansen N. Seheult, Vincent P. Anto, Nadim Farhat, Michelle N. Stram, Philip C. Spinella, Louis Alarcon, Jason Sperry, Darrell J. Triulzi, Mark H. Yazer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A supervised machine learning algorithm was used to generate decision trees for the prediction of massive transfusion at a Level 1 trauma center. METHODS: Trauma patients who received at least one unit of RBCs and/or low-titer group O whole blood between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2017, were included. Massive transfusion was defined as the transfusion of 10 or more units of RBCs and/or low-titer group O whole blood in the first 24 hours of admission. A recursive partitioning algorithm was used to generate two decision trees for prediction of massive transfusion using a training data set (n = 550): the first, MTPitt, was based on demographic and clinical parameters, and the second, MTPitt+Labs, also included laboratory data. Decision tree performance was compared with the Assessment of Blood Consumption score and the Trauma Associated Severe Hemorrhage score. RESULTS: The incidence of massive transfusion in the validation data set (n = 199) was 7.5%. The MTPitt decision tree had a higher balanced accuracy (81.4%) and sensitivity (86.7%) compared to an Assessment of Blood Consumption Score of 2 or higher (77.9% and 66.7%, respectively) and a Trauma Associated Severe Hemorrhage score of 9 or higher (75.0% and 73.3%, respectively), although the 95% confidence intervals overlapped. Addition of laboratory data to the MTPitt decision tree (MTPitt+Labs) resulted in a higher specificity and balanced accuracy compared to MTPitt without an increase in sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: The MTPitt decisions trees are highly sensitive tools for identifying patients who received a massive transfusion and do not require computational resources to be implemented in the trauma setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)953-964
Number of pages12
JournalTransfusion
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Application of a recursive partitioning decision tree algorithm for the prediction of massive transfusion in civilian trauma: the MTPitt prediction tool'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this