Apical support at the time of hysterectomy for uterovaginal prolapse

Kelly L. Kantartzis, Lindsay C. Turner, Jonathan P. Shepherd, Li Wang, Daniel G. Winger, Jerry L. Lowder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: The aim was to determine factors associated with performing concurrent apical support procedures in hysterectomies carried out for uterovaginal prolapse. Methods: Hysterectomies performed for uterovaginal prolapse from 2000 to 2010 were identified by ICD-9 codes. Uterovaginal prolapse was a proxy for apical descent. Primary outcome was the rate of concurrent apical procedures. Secondary outcomes included concurrent surgeries, complications, and surgeon training. Chi-squared tests compared categorical variables. Logistic regression determined factors associated with concurrent apical support. Results: A total of 2,465 hysterectomies were performed for uterovaginal prolapse. In only 1,358 cases (55.1 %) were concurrent apical support procedures carried out. Cases without apical procedures were more likely to undergo cystocele repair (23.8 % vs 9.4 %, p < 0.001), but less likely to have rectocele (3.4 % vs 12.2 %, p < 0.001) or combined cystocele/rectocele repair (16.4 % vs 25.6 %, p < 0.001). Of those without apical procedures, 95.7 % were performed by generalists. Urogynecologists and minimally invasive gynecologists were more likely to perform apical procedures (97.1 % and 88.8 % vs 23.6 %, p < 0.001). Older patients (>75 years) were more likely to undergo apical procedures (OR 5.096, 95 % CI 3.127–8.304). Surgeons practicing for 10–14 years and >20 years were less likely to perform apical procedures than those practicing <5 years (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.01). Conclusions: At a tertiary hospital, a significant proportion of hysterectomies are carried out for uterovaginal prolapse without concurrent apical support procedures, with the majority performed by generalists. Urogynecologists and minimally invasive gynecologists are more likely to perform an apical suspension at the time of hysterectomy for uterovaginal prolapse than generalists. This supports the need for continued education about apical support to appropriately manage uterovaginal prolapse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-212
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Apical prolapse
  • Hysterectomy
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Uterine prolapse

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