Aphasia, family history, and the longitudinal course of senile dementia of the alzheimer type

John W. Knesevich, Felix R. Toro, John C. Morris, Emily LaBarge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aphasia, was present in a majority of subjects in a longitudinal study of 43 subjects with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Aphasic subjects had a more rapidly progressive course but a lower prevalence of familial cases than the study group, other study groups, or the nonaphasic subjects. Conversely, the lack of aphasia was associated with a higher prevalence of familial cases and a slower rate of progression. It is concluded that senile dementia of the Alzheimer type is a heterogeneous disorder in which the presence of aphasia early in the course signifies a nonfamilial, rapidly progressive variety of illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-263
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1985

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • and family history
  • aphasia
  • dementia

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