Antihistaminic versus anticholinergic effects of atropine on canine trachealis muscle

B. E. Skoogh, J. A. Nadel, L. M. Fabbri, D. Sheppard, M. J. Holtzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine antihistaminic versus anticholinergic effects of atropine in airway smooth muscle, we used an in vitro preparation of canine trachaelis muscle strips and determined atropine's effect on contractile responses induced by histamine or by electrical field stimulation of cholinergic nerves. In the first series of experiments, 53 strips had initial responses to field stimulation determined and were then randomly assigned to a control group or to a group treated with atropine before field stimulation was repeated and histamine was given. Atropine in concentrations of 10-8, 10-7, and 10-6 M decreased the response to field stimulation to 61.4, 10.5, and 0% of the initial response, respectively, but had no effect on the responses to histamine. In the second series of experiments, 24 strips were treated with indomethacin to prevent histamine tachyphylaxis; these strips had initial responses to both field stimulation and histamine determined and were then assigned to a control group or to a group treated with atropine before field stimulation and histamine were repeated. In these experiments, a concentration of atropine (10-6 M), which again completely blocked the response to field stimulation, still had no effect on histamine-induced contraction. We conclude that atropine in a concentration that completely blocks the response to cholinergic nerve stimulation has no antihistaminic effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-606
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume128
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1983

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