Antibody targeting GRP78 enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy in human glioblastoma and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and tumor models

David Y.A. Dadey, Vaishali Kapoor, Kelly Hoye, Arpine Khudanyan, Andrea Collins, Dinesh Thotala, Dennis E. Hallahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have poor median survival. NSCLC and GBM overexpress glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), which has a role in radioresistance and recurrence. In this study, we determined the effect of anti-GRP78 antibody and the combined effect of the anti-GRP78 antibody with ionizing radiation (XRT) on NSCLC and GBM cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design: NSCLC and GBM cancer cell lines were treated with anti-GRP78 antibodies and evaluated for proliferation, colony formation, cell death, and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling. The efficacy of anti-GRP78 antibodies on tumor growth in combination with XRT was determined in vivo in mouse xenograft models. Results: GBM and NSCLC cells treated with anti-GRP78 antibodies showed attenuated cell proliferation, colony formation, and enhanced apoptosis. GBM and NSCLC cells treated with anti-GRP78 antibodies also showed global suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling. Combining antibody with XRT resulted in significant tumor growth delay in both NSCLC and GBM heterotopic tumor models. Conclusions: Antibodies targeting GRP78 exhibited antitumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of radiation in NSCLC and GBM both in vitro and in vivo. GRP78 is a promising novel target, and anti-GRP78 antibodies could be used as an effective cancer therapy alone or in combination with XRT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2556-2564
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2017

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