Antibiotic stewardship teams and Clostridioides difficile practices in United States hospitals: A national survey in the Joint Commission antibiotic stewardship standard era

Valerie M. Vaughn, M. Todd Greene, David Ratz, Karen E. Fowler, Sarah L. Krein, Scott A. Flanders, Erik R. Dubberke, Sanjay Saint, Payal K. Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) can be prevented through infection prevention practices and antibiotic stewardship. Diagnostic stewardship (ie, strategies to improve use of microbiological testing) can also improve antibiotic use. However, little is known about the use of such practices in US hospitals, especially after multidisciplinary stewardship programs became a requirement for US hospital accreditation in 2017. Thus, we surveyed US hospitals to assess antibiotic stewardship program composition, practices related to CDI, and diagnostic stewardship.Methods: Surveys were mailed to infection preventionists at 900 randomly sampled US hospitals between May and October 2017. Hospitals were surveyed on antibiotic stewardship programs; CDI prevention, treatment, and testing practices; and diagnostic stewardship strategies. Responses were compared by hospital bed size using weighted logistic regression.Results: Overall, 528 surveys were completed (59% response rate). Almost all (95%) responding hospitals had an antibiotic stewardship program. Smaller hospitals were less likely to have stewardship team members with infectious diseases (ID) training, and only 41% of hospitals met The Joint Commission accreditation standards for multidisciplinary teams. Guideline-recommended CDI prevention practices were common. Smaller hospitals were less likely to use high-Tech disinfection devices, fecal microbiota transplantation, or diagnostic stewardship strategies.Conclusions: Following changes in accreditation standards, nearly all US hospitals now have an antibiotic stewardship program. However, many hospitals, especially smaller hospitals, appear to struggle with access to ID expertise and with deploying diagnostic stewardship strategies. CDI prevention could be enhanced through diagnostic stewardship and by emphasizing the role of non-ID-Trained pharmacists and clinicians in antibiotic stewardship.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-148
Number of pages6
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Antibiotic stewardship teams and Clostridioides difficile practices in United States hospitals: A national survey in the Joint Commission antibiotic stewardship standard era'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this