Anti-anginal medication titration among patients with residual angina 6-months after chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention: Insights from OPEN CTO registry

Justin P. Sheehy, Mohammed Qintar, Suzanne V. Arnold, Taishi Hirai, James Sapontis, Philip G. Jones, Yuanyuan Tang, William Lombardi, Dimitiri Karmpaliotis, Jeffrey W. Moses, Christian Patterson, David J. Cohen, Amit P. Amin, William J. Nicholson, John A. Spertus, James Aaron Grantham, Adam C. Salisbury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: Chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been shown to reduce angina and improve quality of life, but the frequency of new or residual angina after CTO PCI and its relationship with titration of anti-anginal medications (AAMs) has not been described. Methods and results: Among consecutive CTO PCI patients treated at 12 US centres in the OPEN CTO registry, angina was assessed 6 months after the index PCI using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) Angina Frequency scale (a score <100 defined new or residual angina). We then compared the proportion of patients with AAM escalation (defined as an increase in the number or dosage of AAMs between discharge and follow-up) between those with and without 6-month angina. Of 901 patients who underwent CTO PCI, 197 (21.9%) reported angina at 6-months, of whom 80 (40.6%) had de-escalation, 66 (33.5%) had no change, and only 51 (25.9%) had escalation of their AAM by the 6-month follow-up. Rates of AAM escalation were similar when stratifying patients by the ultimate success of the CTO PCI, completeness of physiologic revascularization, presence or absence of angina at baseline, history of heart failure, and by degree of symptomatic improvement after CTO PCI. Conclusions: One in five patients reported angina 6 months after CTO PCI. Although patients with new or residual angina were more likely to have escalation of AAMs in follow-up compared with those without residual symptoms, only one in four patients with residual angina had escalation of AAMs. Although it is unclear whether this finding reflects maximal tolerated therapy at baseline or therapeutic inertia, these findings suggest an important potential opportunity to further improve symptom control in patients with complex stable ischaemic heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-379
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Keywords

  • Angina
  • Anti-anginal medication
  • Chronic total occlusion
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention
  • Quality of life

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