Anatomy of Gun Violence: Contextualized Curriculum to Train Surgical Residents in Both Technical and Non-Technical Skills in the Management of Gun Violence

Emily Jean Onufer, Erin Andrade, Darren R. Cullinan, Jessica Kramer, Jennifer Leonard, Melissa Stewart, Kelly Vallar, Paul E. Wise, Mary E. Klingensmith, L. J. Punch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Gun violence (GV) is a complex public health issue, and the management of GV as a disease engages the surgeon in technical and nontechnical skills. The Anatomy of Gun Violence (AGV) curriculum was developed to teach surgical trainees these seemingly disparate skills, training residents to manage the multiple aspects of firearm injury. Study Design: The AGV curriculum was delivered over 6 weeks in the 2017–2018 and 2018–2019 academic years (AY), and used multiple educational methods including didactic lectures, mock oral examinations, a Bleeding Control training session, a GV survivor's personal story, a Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) training session, and the Surgery for Abdominal-thoracic ViolencE (SAVE) simulation lab. As surgical residents were involved over both AYs, components of the curriculum were available every other year to provide variety. As proof of concept, this novel curriculum was objectively evaluated by residents’ improvement in knowledge and overall experience using pre- and post-surveys. Results: Sixty surgical residents participated in the AGV curriculum in both AYs, with 41 and 36 residents completing the survey regarding their experiences with the curriculum. The curriculum was well received by residents overall in both AYs (median ± IQR 5 ± 0 and 5 ± 0.1, respectively), with the SAVE simulation lab being the most highly favored portion. Additionally, residents had an average 7.5% improvement in knowledge attributed to the curriculum, with a larger effect seen in the junior residents. Conclusions: This novel AGV curriculum created a well-received learning experience involving the technical and nontechnical skills necessary to care for GV victims. This comprehensive approach to GV may represent a unique opportunity to engage surgical trainees in both the treatment and prevention of firearm injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)628-637.e7
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume231
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

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