Altered hemodynamics contribute to local but not remote functional connectivity disruption due to glioma growth

Inema E. Orukari, Joshua S. Siegel, Nicole M. Warrington, Grant A. Baxter, Adam Q. Bauer, Joshua S. Shimony, Joshua B. Rubin, Joseph P. Culver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Glioma growth can cause pervasive changes in the functional connectivity (FC) of brain networks, which has been associated with re-organization of brain functions and development of functional deficits in patients. Mechanisms underlying functional re-organization in brain networks are not understood and efforts to utilize functional imaging for surgical planning, or as a biomarker of functional outcomes are confounded by the heterogeneity in available human data. Here we apply multiple imaging modalities in a well-controlled murine model of glioma with extensive validation using human data to explore mechanisms of FC disruption due to glioma growth. We find gliomas cause both local and distal changes in FC. FC changes in networks proximal to the tumor occur secondary to hemodynamic alterations but surprisingly, remote FC changes are independent of hemodynamic mechanisms. Our data strongly implicate hemodynamic alterations as the main driver of local changes in measurements of FC in patients with glioma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-115
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Functional connectivity
  • glioma
  • hemodynamic lags
  • mouse model
  • neurovascular uncoupling

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