Alcohol use polygenic risk score, social support, and alcohol use among European American and African American adults

Jinni Su, Sally I.Chun Kuo, Fazil Aliev, Jill A. Rabinowitz, Belal Jamil, Grace Chan, Howard J. Edenberg, Meredith Francis, Victor Hesselbrock, Chella Kamarajan, Sivan Kinreich, John Kramer, Donbing Lai, Vivia McCutcheon, Jacquelyn Meyers, Ashwini Pandey, Gayathri Pandey, Martin H. Plawecki, Marc Schuckit, Jay TischfieldDanielle M. Dick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Alcohol use is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. We examined the interactive effects between genome-wide polygenic risk scores for alcohol use (alc-PRS) and social support in relation to alcohol use among European American (EA) and African American (AA) adults across sex and developmental stages (emerging adulthood, young adulthood, and middle adulthood). Data were drawn from 4,011 EA and 1,274 AA adults from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism who were between ages 18-65 and had ever used alcohol. Participants completed the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism and provided saliva or blood samples for genotyping. Results indicated that social support from friends, but not family, moderated the association between alc-PRS and alcohol use among EAs and AAs (only in middle adulthood for AAs); alc-PRS was associated with higher levels of alcohol use when friend support was low, but not when friend support was high. Associations were similar across sex but differed across developmental stages. Findings support the important role of social support from friends in buffering genetic risk for alcohol use among EA and AA adults and highlight the need to consider developmental changes in the role of social support in relation to alcohol use.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • COGA
  • alcohol use
  • gene-environment interaction
  • polygenic scores
  • social support

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