Adverse Prognosis of ST Depression on the Resting Electrocardiogram in Stable Patients Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: An Analysis of the Basis for this Association

Edward M. Dwyer, Robert B. Case, John A. Gillespie, Henry M. Greenberg, Ronald J. Krone, Edgar Lichstein, Arthur J. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of stable patients with resting ST segment depression on the resting electrocardiogram (ECG) following an acute ischemic event (i.e., infarction or unstable angina) to better understand its association with subsequent cardiac death and nonfatal infarction. The recent Multicenter Study of Myocardial Ischemia (MSMI) demonstrated that the resting ST segment depression had an independent prognostic value. Methods: We studied clinical features, noninvasive test results and coronary arteriography findings in 99 patients with ST depression on the resting ECG and 837 patients without ST segment depression with respect to endpoints of cardiac death and hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Results: Our results showed that patients with resting ECG ST depression were significantly older with a higher incidence of hypertension, angina, claudication, and tobacco use. ST depression on the resting ECG correlated closely with ST segment depression on the 24-hour ambulatory ECG and the exercise ECG but not with redistribution on the thallium perfusion scan. Left ventricular diastolic pressure was higher and exercise duration less in patients with ST depression. Although not achieving statistical significance, patients with ST depression did show more extensive coronary disease and a lower ejection traction. Conclusions: ECG ST depression was associated with cardiac death and nonfatal reinfarction over the follow-up period only in patients originally admitted with an acute infarction but not in patients hospitalized for unstable angina. The reason for this appears to be an association of ST depression with increased age, the presence of hypertension, the presence of more severe coronary disease, and more extensive myocardial damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-62
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Electrocardiogram
  • Myocardial infarction
  • ST depression

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