Adoptive transfer of apoptotic splenocytes worsens survival, whereas adoptive transfer of necrotic splenocytes improves survival in sepsis

Richard S. Hotchkiss, Katherine C. Chang, Mitchell H. Grayson, Kevin W. Tinsley, Benjamin S. Dunne, Christopher G. Davis, Dale F. Osborne, Irene E. Karl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

In sepsis, both necrotic and apoptotic cell death can occur. Apoptotic cells induce anergy that could impair the host response, whereas necrotic cells cause immune activation that might result in enhanced antimicrobial defenses. We determined whether adoptive transfer of apoptotic or necrotic cells impacted survival in a clinically relevant sepsis model. We also evaluated the effects of adoptive transfer of apoptotic or necrotic cells on the prototypical TH1 and TH2 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-4, respectively. C57BL6/J mice had adoptive transfer of apoptotic (irradiated) or necrotic (freeze thaw) splenocytes. Controls received saline. Apoptotic cells greatly increased mortality, whereas necrotic splenocytes markedly improved survival, P ≤ 0.05. The contrasting effects that apoptotic or necrotic cells exerted on survival were mirrored by opposite effects on splenocyte IFN-γ production with greatly decreased and increased production, respectively. Importantly, either administration of anti-IFN-γ antibodies or use of IFN-γ knockout mice prevented the survival benefit occurring with necrotic cells. This study demonstrates that the type of cell death impacts survival in a clinically relevant model and identifies a mechanism for the immune suppression that is a hallmark of sepsis. Necrotic cells (and likely apoptotic cells) exert their effects via modulation of IFN-γ.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6724-6729
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume100
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2003

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