Adolescent and mid-life diet: Risk of colorectal cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

Elizabeth H. Ruder, Anne C.M. Thiébaut, Frances E. Thompson, Nancy Potischman, Amy F. Subar, Yikyung Park, Barry I. Graubard, Albert R. Hollenbeck, Amanda J. Cross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Colorectal cancer has a natural history of several decades; therefore, the diet consumed decades before diagnosis may aid in understanding this malignancy. Objective: The objective was to investigate diet during adolescence and 10 y before baseline (ages 40-61 y) in relation to colorectal cancer. Design: Participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (n = 292,797) completed a 124-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) about diet in the past 12 mo and two 37-item FFQs about diet at ages 12-13 y and 10 y previously. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariate HRs and 95% CIs for colon (n = 2794) and rectal (n = 979) cancers within quintiles of exposures. Results: Colon cancer risk was lower in the highest than in the lowest quintile of vitamin A (HR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.92) and vegetable (HR: 0.81, 0.70, 0.92) intakes during adolescence. Those in the highest intake category 10 y previously for calcium (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.94), vitamin A (HR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.92), vitamin C (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.95), fruit (HR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.97), and milk (HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.90) had a lower risk of colon cancer, but a higher risk was observed for total fat (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.30), red meat (HR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.53), and processed meat (HR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.45). For rectal cancer, milk was inversely associated (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.96) with risk. Conclusion: Adolescent and midlife diet may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1607-1619
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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