Admixture determines genetic diversity and population differentiation in the biological invasion of a lizard species

Jason J. Kolbe, Allan Larson, Jonathan B. Losos, Kevin De Queiroz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

110 Scopus citations

Abstract

Molecular genetic analyses show that introduced populations undergoing biological invasions often bring together individuals from genetically disparate native-range source populations, which can elevate genotypic variation if these individuals interbreed. Differential admixture among multiple native-range sources explains mitochondrial haplotypic diversity within and differentiation among invasive populations of the lizard Anolis sagrei. Our examination of microsatellite variation supports the hypothesis that lizards from disparate native-range sources, identified using mtDNA haplotypes, form genetically admixed introduced populations. Furthermore, within-population genotypic diversity increases with the number of sources and among-population genotypic differentiation reflects disparity in their native-range sources. If adaptive genetic variation is similarly restructured, then the ability of invasive species to adapt to new conditions may be enhanced.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-437
Number of pages4
JournalBiology Letters
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2008

Keywords

  • Introduced species
  • Microsatellite
  • Mitochondrial DNA
  • Multiple native-range sources

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Admixture determines genetic diversity and population differentiation in the biological invasion of a lizard species'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this