Addition of exenatide twice daily to basal insulin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Clinical studies and practical approaches to therapy

G. S. Tobin, M. K. Cavaghan, B. J. Hoogwerf, J. B. McGill

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that requires stepwise additions of non-insulin and insulin therapies to meet recommended glycaemic goals. The final stage of intensification may require prandial insulin, adding complexity and increased risks of hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Aims: This review assesses the benefits and risks of adding exenatide twice daily, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, in patients with type 2 diabetes who are currently treated with basal insulin, but have failed to reach their glycaemic goals. Methods and Results: Based on data from published studies, exenatide has a number of actions that complement basal insulin therapy. Exenatide has been shown to increase glucose-dependent insulin production, suppress abnormal plasma glucagon production, slow gastric emptying, enhance liver uptake of glucose and promote satiety. A recently published randomised clinical trial reported that the addition of exenatide twice daily to titrated basal insulin provided greater glycaemic control than titrated basal insulin alone, and did so without an increase in hypoglycaemic events and with modest weight loss. Exenatide use was associated with gastrointestinal side effects. The recent randomised trial confirmed and extended data from a number of prior observational studies that demonstrated the efficacy and safety of insulin/exenatide combination therapy. Practical considerations for adding exenatide twice daily to ongoing basal insulin are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1147-1157
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Practice
Volume66
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

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