Adapting interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain in rural african american girls

Omni Cassidy, Tracy Sbrocco, Anna Vannucci, Beatrice Nelson, Darlene Jackson-Bowen, James Heimdal, Nazrat Mirza, Denise E. Wilfley, Robyn Osborn, Lauren B. Shomaker, Jami F. Young, Heather Waldron, Michele Carter, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To obtain focus group data regarding the perspectives of rural African American (AA) girls, parents/guardians, and community leaders on obesity, loss of control (LOC) eating, relationships, and interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain (IPT-WG). Methods 7 focus groups (N = 50 participants) were moderated and the transcripts analyzed by Westat researchers using widely accepted methods of qualitative and thematic analysis. A session was held with experts in health disparities to elucidate themes. Results Participants understood LOC eating; however, they had culturally specific perceptions including usage of alternative terms. Relationships were highly valued, specifically those between mothers and daughters. IPT-WG program components generally resonated with participants, although modifications were recommended to respect parental roles. Experts interpreted focus group themes and discussed potential barriers and solutions to recruitment and participation. Conclusion Findings suggest that adapting IPT-WG may be acceptable to rural AA families. This research is the first step in developing a sustainable excessive weight gain and binge eating disorder prevention program for rural AA adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)965-977
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Keywords

  • African American
  • community-based participatory research
  • interpersonal psychotherapy
  • loss of control eating
  • obesity
  • prevention

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adapting interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain in rural african american girls'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Cassidy, O., Sbrocco, T., Vannucci, A., Nelson, B., Jackson-Bowen, D., Heimdal, J., Mirza, N., Wilfley, D. E., Osborn, R., Shomaker, L. B., Young, J. F., Waldron, H., Carter, M., & Tanofsky-Kraff, M. (2013). Adapting interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain in rural african american girls. Journal of pediatric psychology, 38(9), 965-977. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jst029