Acute minocycline administration reduces brain injury and improves long-term functional outcomes after delayed hypoxemia following traumatic brain injury

Marta Celorrio, Kirill Shumilov, Camryn Payne, Sangeetha Vadivelu, Stuart H. Friess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinical trials of therapeutics for traumatic brain injury (TBI) demonstrating preclinical efficacy for TBI have failed to replicate these results in humans, in part due to the absence of clinically feasible therapeutic windows for administration. Minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, has been shown to be neuroprotective when administered early after experimental TBI but detrimental when administered chronically to human TBI survivors. Rather than focusing on the rescue of primary injury with early administration of therapeutics which may not be clinically feasible, we hypothesized that minocycline administered at a clinically feasible time point (24 h after injury) would be neuroprotective in a model of TBI plus delayed hypoxemia. We first explored several different regimens of minocycline dosing with the initial dose 24 h after injury and 2 h prior to hypoxemia, utilizing short-term neuropathology to select the most promising candidate. We found that a short course of minocycline reduced acute microglial activation, monocyte infiltration and hippocampal neuronal loss at 1 week post injury. We then conducted a preclinical trial to assess the long-term efficacy of a short course of minocycline finding reductions in hippocampal neurodegeneration and synapse loss, preservation of white matter myelination, and improvements in fear memory performance at 6 months after injury. Timing in relation to injury and duration of minocycline treatment and its impact on neuroinflammatory response may be responsible for extensive neuroprotection observed in our studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10
JournalActa Neuropathologica Communications
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Hypoxemia
  • Minocycline
  • Neuroprotection
  • Pre-clinical trial
  • Secondary injury
  • Traumatic brain injury

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