Activity characteristics and movement patterns in people with and people without low back pain who participate in rotation-related sports

Ruth L. Chimenti, Sara A. Scholtes, Linda R. Van Dillen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many risk factors have been identified as contributing to the development or persistence of low back pain (LBP). However, the juxtaposition of both high and low levels of physical activity being associated with LBP reflects the complexity of the relationship between a risk factor and LBP. Moreover, not everyone with an identified risk factor, such as a movement pattern of increased lumbopelvic rotation, has LBP. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in activity level and movement patterns between people with and people without chronic or recurrent LBP who participate in rotation-related sports. Design Case: Casecontrol study. Setting: University laboratory environment. Participants: 52 people with chronic or recurrent LBP and 25 people without LBP who all play a rotation-related sport. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed self-report measures including the Baecke Habitual Activity Questionnaire and a questionnaire on rotation-related sports. A 3-dimensional motion-capture system was used to collect movement-pattern variables during 2 lower-limb-movement tests. Results: Compared with people without LBP, people with LBP reported a greater difference between the sport subscore and an average work and leisure composite subscore on the Baecke Habitual Activity Questionnaire (F = 6.55, P = .01). There were no differences between groups in either rotation-related-sport participation or movement-pattern variables demonstrated during 2 lower-limbmovement tests (P > .05 for all comparisons). Conclusions: People with and people without LBP who regularly play a rotation-related sport differed in the amount and nature of activity participation but not in movementpattern variables. An imbalance between level of activity during sport and daily functions may contribute to the development or persistence of LBP in people who play a rotation-related sport.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Athlete
  • LBP
  • Rehabilitation

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