Acculturation, Substance Use, and Deviant Behavior: Examining Separation and Family Conflict as Mediators

Amy McQueen, J. Greg Getz, James H. Bray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

101 Scopus citations

Abstract

This longitudinal study examined how separation and family conflict mediated the effects of two acculturation variables (English language use and generational status) on substance use (alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use) and deviant behavior outcomes in a Mexican American high school age sample. Structural equation modeling indicated that separation was a significant mediator of the relationship between acculturation and alcohol use, tobacco use, and deviant behavior. Family conflict mediated the effects of acculturation on marijuana use and deviant behavior. Model comparisons across gender groups suggested that generational status was an influential acculturation measure for females but not males. Additionally, English language use maintained a direct effect on marijuana use among females, whereas this relationship was mediated by separation for males.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1737-1750
Number of pages14
JournalChild Development
Volume74
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

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