A twin study of the association of post-traumatic stress disorder and combat exposure with long-term socioeconomic status in Vietnam veterans

Madeline McCarren, Gail R. Janes, Jack Goldberg, Seth A. Eisen, William R. True, William G. Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and combat exposure with the socioeconomic status of 2210 male monozygotic veteran twin pairs in 1987. In the unadjusted analysis on individuals, modest correlations indicated that those with PTSD were more likely to have been divorced, and less likely to be currently employed or to achieve high status in income, education or occupation. In the crude analysis of veterans not suffering from PTSD, there were small positive correlations between combat level experienced and the likelihood of ever being married, ever being divorced, and the number of years employed at the current job. However, when we examined identical twins discordant for PTSD, and adjusted for pre-military and military service factors, only unemployment remained significant. Likewise, in combat-discordant twins, no significant effects on the socioeconomic indicators were seen. We conclude that PTSD and combat experience in Southeast Asia have not had a major impact on the socioeconomic status of veterans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-124
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1995

Keywords

  • PTSD
  • combat
  • education
  • marriage
  • occupation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A twin study of the association of post-traumatic stress disorder and combat exposure with long-term socioeconomic status in Vietnam veterans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this