A systematic method for clinical description and classification of personality variants

C. Robert Cloninger

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    A systematic method for clinical description and classification of both normal and abnormal personality variants is proposed based on a general blosoclal theory of personality. Three dimensions of personality are defined in terma of the basic stimulus-response characteristics of novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and reward dependence. The possible underlying genetic and neuroanatomlcal bases of observed variation in these dimensions are reviewed and considered in relation to adaptive responses to environmental challenge. The functional interaction of these dimensions leads to integrated patterna of differential response to novelty, punishment, and reward. The possible tridimensional combinations of extreme (high or low) variants on these basic stimulusresponse characteristics correspond closely to traditional descriptions 01 personality disorders. This reconciles dimensional and categorical approaches to personality description. It also implies that the underlying structure of normaladaptlva tralta is the same as that of maladaptive personality tralia, except for schlzotypal and paranoid disorder.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Science of Mental Health
    Subtitle of host publicationVolume 7: Personality and Personality Disorder
    PublisherTaylor and Francis
    Pages1-16
    Number of pages16
    ISBN (Electronic)9781136767562
    ISBN (Print)0815337434, 9780815337508
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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  • Cite this

    Robert Cloninger, C. (2013). A systematic method for clinical description and classification of personality variants. In The Science of Mental Health: Volume 7: Personality and Personality Disorder (pp. 1-16). Taylor and Francis.