A single amino acid difference between cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and -2 (COX-2) reverses the selectivity of COX-2 specific inhibitors

James K. Gierse, Joseph J. McDonald, Scott D. Hauser, Shaukat H. Rangwala, Carol M. Koboldt, Karen Seibert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

363 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) currently available for clinical use inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2. This suggests that clinically useful NSAIDs inhibit pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs) derived from the activity of COX-2, as well as PGs in tissues like the stomach and kidney (via COX-1). A new class of compounds has recently been developed (SC-58125) that have a high degree of selectivity for the inducible form of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) over the constitutive form (COX-1). This unique class of compounds exhibit a time-dependent irreversible inhibition of COX-2, while reversibly inhibiting COX-1. The molecular basis of this selectivity was probed by site- directed mutagenesis of the active site of COX-2. The sequence differences in the active site were determined by amino acid replacement of the COX-2 sequences based on the known crystal structure of COX-1, which revealed a single amino acid difference in the active site (valine 509 to isoleucine) and a series of differences at the mouth of the active site. Mutants with the single amino acid substitution in the active site and a combination of three changes in the mouth of the active site were made in human COX-2, expressed in insect cells and purified. The single amino acid change of valine 509 to isoleucine confers selectivity of COX-2 inhibitors in the class of SC-58125 and others of the same class (SC-236, NS-398), while commonly used NSAIDs such as indomethacin showed no change in selectivity. Substitutions of COX-1 sequences in COX-2 at the mouth of the active site of COX-2 did not change the selectivity of SC-58125. This indicates that the single amino acid substitution of isoleucine at position 509 for a valine is sufficient to confer COX-2 selectivity in this example of a diaryl-heterocycle COX inhibitor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15810-15814
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume271
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 16 1996

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