A novel T-cell receptor mimic defines dendritic cells that present an immunodominant West Nile virus epitope in mice

Sojung Kim, Amelia K. Pinto, Nancy B. Myers, Oriana Hawkins, Krysten Doll, Saghar Kaabinejadian, Jason Netland, Michael J. Bevan, Jon A. Weidanz, William H. Hildebrand, Michael S. Diamond, Ted H. Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used a newly generated T-cell receptor mimic monoclonal antibody (TCRm MAb) that recognizes a known nonself immunodominant peptide epitope from West Nile virus (WNV) NS4B protein to investigate epitope presentation after virus infection in C57BL/6 mice. Previous studies suggested that peptides of different length, either SSVWNATTAI (10-mer) or SSVWNATTA (9-mer) in complex with class I MHC antigen H-2Db, were immunodominant after WNV infection. Our data establish that both peptides are presented on the cell surface after WNV infection and that CD8+ T cells can detect 10- and 9-mer length variants similarly. This result varies from the idea that a given T-cell receptor (TCR) prefers a single peptide length bound to its cognate class I MHC. In separate WNV infection studies with the TCRm MAb, we show that in vivo the 10-mer was presented on the surface of uninfected and infected CD8α+CD11c+ dendritic cells, which suggests the use of direct and cross-presentation pathways. In contrast, CD11b+CD11c- cells bound the TCRm MAb only when they were infected. Our study demonstrates that TCR recognition of peptides is not limited to certain peptide lengths and that TCRm MAbs can be used to dissect the cell-type specific mechanisms of antigen presentation in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1936-1946
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume44
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Antigen presentation
  • Cytotoxic T lymphocytes
  • Flavivirus
  • T-cell receptor mimic

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