A novel rat model of vitamin D deficiency: Safe and rapid induction of vitamin D and calcitriol deficiency without hyperparathyroidism

Andrea W.D. Stavenuiter, Maria Vittoria Arcidiacono, Evelina Ferrantelli, Eelco D. Keuning, Marc Vila Cuenca, Piet M. Ter Wee, Robert H.J. Beelen, Marc G. Vervloet, Adriana S. Dusso

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27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a range of clinical disorders. To study the mechanisms involved and improve treatments, animal models are tremendously useful. Current vitamin D deficient rat models have important practical limitations, including time requirements when using, exclusively, a vitamin D deficient diet. More importantly, induction of hypovitaminosis D causes significant fluctuations in parathyroid hormone (PTH) and mineral levels, complicating the interpretation of study results. To overcome these shortcomings, we report the successful induction of vitamin D deficiency within three weeks, with stable serum PTH and minerals levels, in Wistar rats. We incorporated two additional manoeuvres compared to a conventional diet. Firstly, the vitamin D depleted diet is calcium (Ca) enriched, to attenuate the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Secondly, six intraperitoneal injections of paricalcitol during the first two weeks are given to induce the rapid degradation of circulating vitamin D metabolites. After three weeks, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) levels had dropped below detection limits, with unchanged serum PTH, Ca, and phosphate (P) levels. Therefore, this model provides a useful tool to examine the sole effect of hypovitaminosis D, in a wide range of research settings, without confounding changes in PTH, Ca, and P.

Original languageEnglish
Article number604275
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2015

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