A Next-Generation Sequencing Test for Severe Congenital Neutropenia: Utility in a Broader Clinicopathologic Spectrum of Disease

Samantha N. McNulty, Michael J. Evenson, Meaghan Riley, Jennifer M. Yoest, Meagan M. Corliss, Jonathan W. Heusel, Eric J. Duncavage, John D. Pfeifer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a collection of diverse disorders characterized by chronically low absolute neutrophil count in the peripheral blood, increased susceptibility to infection, and a significant predisposition to the development of myeloid malignancies. SCN can be acquired or inherited. Inherited forms have been linked to variants in a group of diverse genes involved in the neutrophil-differentiation process. Variants that promote resistance to treatment have also been identified. Thus, genetic testing is important for the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SCN. Herein we describe clinically validated assay developed for assessing patients with suspected SCN. The assay is performed from a whole-exome backbone. Variants are called across all coding exons, and results are filtered to focus on 48 genes that are clinically relevant to SCN. Validation results indicated 100% analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of constitutional variants among the 48 reportable genes. To date, 34 individuals have been referred for testing (age range: birth to 67 years). Several pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants have been identified, including one in a patient with late-onset disease. The pattern of cases referred for testing suggests that this assay has clinical utility in a broader spectrum of patients beyond those in the pediatric population who have classic early-onset symptoms characteristic of SCN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)200-211
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Molecular Diagnostics
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

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