A multicenter, randomized trial of daily high-dose interferon-alfa 2b for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C: Pretreatment stratification by viral burden and genotype

Michael W. Fried, Mitchell Shiffman, Richard K. Sterling, Jeffrey Weinstein, Jeffrey Crippin, Gabriel Garcia, Teresa L. Wright, Hari Conjeevaram, K. Rajender Reddy, Joy Peter, George A. Cotsonis, Frederick S. Nolte

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57 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine prospectively whether an intensive regimen of daily, high-dose interferon would improve the response rate for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients with unfavorable virological characteristics. METHODS: A total of 104 patients with chronic hepatitis C were randomized at eight centers to receive interferon alfa-2b at a dose of 5 million units (MU) daily or 3 MU t.i.w. for a period of 24 wk. Patients were prospectively randomized by low or high viral burden and stratified by genotype. HCV RNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and response rates were compared between the dosage regimens. RESULTS: HCV RNA levels dropped more rapidly to lower levels in the group treated with 5 MU daily. In this group, the initial virological response (IR) at wk 12 and the end-of-treatment response (ETR) at wk 24 were double that of patients treated with standard interferon (66% vs 33% and 48% vs 24%, p < 0.01). Sustained response rates were low for both dose groups (14% vs 4%, p = 0.08). Genotype-related differences in initial response rates were present in the standard dose group (63% non-1 genotype vs 24% genotype 1; p = 0.005) but not in those treated with 5 MU daily (66% vs 67%, p = NS). Using multivariate analysis, only the interferon dose was associated with IR and ETR (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Daily, high dose interferon rapidly dropped HCV RNA and increased initial and end-of-treatment response rates when compared to t.i.w, regimens. This effect, independent of viral burden and genotype, suggests that patients with unfavorable viral characteristics might benefit from an intensive regimen that promotes rapid viral clearance. These data support further study of the use of high-dose induction regimens. However, improvements in sustained response rates will require additional therapeutic maneuvers such as prolonged therapy or the adjunctive use of ribavirin. (C) 2000 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3225-3229
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume95
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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