2.4 Self-assembling biomaterials

J. S. Rudra, S. H. Kelly, J. H. Collier

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-assembly has become a useful way of constructing biomaterials for a variety of applications ranging from cell culture to tissue engineering. Attractive features of self-assembled biomaterials include chemical definition, modularity, stimulus-sensitivity, and the ability to produce complex supramolecular objects from comparatively simple precursors. These aspects also make self-assembly an effective way of bridging the practicality of synthetic materials with the molecular and structural complexity of biologically derived materials. In this chapter, self-assembling strategies are summarized, with particular emphasis on materials employing peptides and proteins as the essential oligomerizing components. Two-dimensional self-assemblies, primarily self-assembled monolayers, are also overviewed. Immune responses to supramolecular biomaterials, advantages that arise from self-assembling approaches, and examples of recent in vivo applications of these materials are additionally discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComprehensive Biomaterials II
PublisherElsevier
Pages67-89
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9780081006924
ISBN (Print)9780081006917
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Amphiphiles
  • Biomimetic
  • Coiled coil
  • Collagen
  • Fibrillar
  • Hydrogels
  • Immunogencity
  • Peptide-polymer
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)
  • Self-assembly
  • Tissue engineering
  • Vaccine
  • β-Sheet

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